Goring & Streatley


"The Best Greens in The Area"

"This golf course was in superb condition from tee to green; without exception. The best greens I have played in a long time"  Read more fantastic course reviews.

Goring and Streatley is a family orientated club nestled in the Thames Valley just outside Goring on Thames set in an idyllic location.  The course has magnificent views of the Ridgeway & the River Thames winding like a silver ribbon on its way from Oxford to Reading and is situated in an area of outstanding natural beauty, which almost consoles the ravages of a bad round of golf!

Goring & Streatley is a chalk based course with excpetional drainage. The fabulous golf course is an 18 hole 6008 yard par 71 from the yellow tees and was designed by Harry Colt and JH Taylor in 1895.

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We are Rated 4.7 out 5.0 for 178 Reviews on Golfshake.  Read our Great Reviews HERE

Goring and Streatley Golf Course Reiews

About "Harry Colt and His Courses"

Goring and Streatley Golf Club, Harry Colt Designer​​

Henry Shapland "Harry" Colt (4 August 1869 – 21 November 1951) was a golf course architect born in Highgate, England.  He participated in the design of over 300 golf courses (115 on his own) in North America, South America, Europe, Australia, Asia, and Africa. Colt's courses of note in the UK include Sunningdale (New course), Rye, Blackmoor, Brancepeth Castle, Brokenhurst Manor, Camberley Heath, Stoke Park Club, Goring and Streatley Golf Club and the East & West Courses at Wentworth Club. He performed extensive redesigns of Sunningdale (Old course) and of Muirfield and the Royal Liverpool Golf Club, Hoylake, two of the courses on the rota for the Open Championship. 

Colt and his colleagues had only a few simple rules. Firstly, that early holes should not be demanding. Secondly, that using every club in the bag throughout a round is ideal, and that thirdly, the routing of the course should be determined by the land. The number of pars determined for a course fell apon the layout of the land and not any solid rule.

Colt’s design principles were based on the natural aesthetics of the land. Any alterations had to blend in with the environment and not impose on it. Anything added to the natural landscape would grow to be a part of it. Colt would draw on the natural landscapes of the links and apply them to his inland courses so that they too would become a living and lasting record of his work.

Courses that favour the deep 'pot' bunker are most likely to be designed by Colt. He was keen on the small but deep hazards as getting out of them required both technique and plenty of skill. Where possible, his courses followed the flow of the land, in much the same way as links courses. However, many of Colts inland layouts included the dogleg. That said, although there was usually trouble in front of most tees. Colt’s punishments were delivered to poor hitters – those that would top or miss hit, or strike a crooked shot. Layouts would also test the better player that would try to play distance in their aim to gain a shot, only to fall short and bunker giving a shot away to the lesser man.





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